Interviews

 

The Tavis Smiley Show, PBS, April 9, 2015

Allyson joins a panel of historians to discuss the Civil War and its enduring legacies on the 150th anniversary of its last battle.


tavis smiley TV logo.jpg

The Tavis Smiley Show, PBS, April 9, 2015

Allyson joins a panel of historians to discuss the Civil War and its enduring legacies on the 150th anniversary of its last battle.


In the following interviews, Allyson discusses the painful consequences of passing. She argues that writing a history of passing is writing a history of loss.


NewsOne Now with Roland Martin, February 27, 2015


The Madison Show, SiriusXM, November 13, 2014


Genealogy Live Talk Radio with Bernice Bennett, November 7, 2014



Moncrieff, Newstalk Radio (Ireland), [at 9:15], October 30, 2014


All Things Considered, National Public Radio, October 7, 2014

Several years ago, Stanford historian Allyson Hobbs was talking with a favorite aunt, who was also the family storyteller. Hobbs learned that she had a distant cousin whom she'd never met nor heard of. Which is exactly the way the cousin wanted it. Hobbs' cousin had been living as white, far away in California, since she'd graduated from high school. This was at the insistence of her mother. "She was black, but she looked white," Hobbs said. "And her mother decided it was in her best interest to move far away from Chicago, to Los Angeles, and to assume the life of a white woman."
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“Stanford Historian Re-Examines Practice of Racial ‘Passing,’” Stanford News, December 18, 2013

Dr. Albert Johnston grew up in Chicago, attended the University of Chicago Medical School in the 1920s, and went on to become a radiologist in a small town in New Hampshire. He and his wife were black – a fact they initially hid so that Johnston could secure an internship – and for 20 years, they kept this secret from their neighbors, and even their children.
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